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Ex-Teachers Cite Frustration
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Ex-Teachers Cite Frustration with Policy as Reason They Resign

A third of new teachers leave the profession in their first three years and only 40 to 50 percent remain after five years. These devastating figures are compounded by the loss of talent and cost to train and hire new teachers. A recently released study by Georgia State University suggests that teachers don’t leave the job because they fall out of love with teaching or over low pay. Teachers who resigned cited tensions with their fellow educators and administrators over teaching philosophies and school policies. Teachers are also more likely to exit the profession if they fear they cannot express concerns or have a lack power.

Georgia State University researchers and their public school partners spent more than two years studying teacher retention and mobility at a high needs school in the metro Atlanta area. The research team collected 134 teachers’ perceptions of why teachers choose to remain at or leave their school. The researchers found the teachers stay in the classroom if they have positive relationships with other educators and administrators, a diverse student population and an environment that emphasizes academic student achievement.

Based on their findings, the research team developed a two-dimensional model that may help educators determine what school environments are best for them. “Our model can help teachers be more informed job hunters,” Meyers said. “If they identify shared educational beliefs when they interview, they may be more likely to stay at that school.” The model could also be used to help administrators screen and hire educators that will work well in their schools and perhaps promote retention.

The study was published in the Journal of Teacher Education earlier this year. Click here to read the entire article.

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